In the past and present, Beach 116th Street always attracted a big crowd. The design and layout remained the same for decades. This photo postcard is naturally dark. I’m taking a guess that the weather for that day was slightly overcast, considering the fully-dressed attire on the folks walking along the boardwalk, as bathing suits were beginning to show more skin. 

 

Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach historian, Emil R. Lucev Sr. (1933-2018).

The Queens Beach Hotel was built around 1920 and was owned by the Reilly Bros. It was located on Beach 107th Street and the north side of Rockaway Beach Blvd. The telephone number was “Belle Harbor – 1499.” The hotel featured furnished rooms to rent all year round, a restaurant and a dance hall with an orchestra during the summer months only. 

 

Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach historian, Emil R. Lucev Sr. (1933-2018).

An atlas of 1924 revealed that the Rockaway Point YMCA Chapel was located on the west side of Bedford Avenue, north of Market Street between Fire Department No.2 and the White Cross Hospital. It appears that a well-attended show has just let out for a photo opportunity and a Native American Chief is shown in the center of this photo.

 

Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach historian, Emil R. Lucev Sr. (1933-2018).

The City of Syracuse, New York installed a traffic signal at the main intersection of Tompkins Street and Milton Avenue in 1925. Irish families had settled on Tipperary Hill for almost 100 years previous, but the deep-rooted, politically-fueled resentment that many Irish felt toward Britain hadn’t faded a bit. The idea that a red light appeared above the green on the traffic signal was interpreted by many in the neighborhood to mean that Britain (red) was in some way superior to Ireland

Fort Decatur was a United States Army Blockhouse, located around Beach 137th Street, the first fort on the peninsula. During The War of 1812, the cannon was moved into position atop of the fort. Beach 137th Street was approximately the western tip of the peninsula at the time. This protected the New York Harbor from any invaders, particularly the British. The fort was dismantled after the war ended (1815).

 

Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach historian, Emil R. Lucev Sr

The first Seaside Dock was built in the late 1850s. After the Civil War (1861-65), it was greatly redesigned and improved to welcome larger steamboats to the peninsula. In later years, five more docks were built at Beaches 104th, 105th, 106th, 108th and 116th streets. Boating traffic successfully increased to the Rockaways. Here we see the Grand Republic Steamer at the Seaside Dock. Today you would be looking northeast from the corner of the sewage plant over Beach Channel Drive towards Beach

Looking “Majestic” with no parking island in the middle. This infrastructure has changed many times in the last century. This is how it looked BEST! Today’s view is from the boulevard looking north towards the bay.

 Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach historian, Emil R. Lucev Sr. (1933-2018).

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