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THE IRISH MILK MAN 1830s

The O’Connell Brothers’ milk wagon was painted by Nicolino Calyo for a series of New York street scenes, circa 1830s. Irish-born men and women made up 40% of the city’s peddlers as late as 1855, mainly selling farm produce such as milk, vegetables, and fruit. New York’s corner grocery stores were Irish until German immigration at midcentury brought competition. (Photo courtesy of Museum of the City of New York). Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach Historian, Emil R. Lucev, Sr. (1933-2018)  

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NYC ST. PATTY’s PARADE 1919

Members of the St. Columcille Branch of the Friends of Irish Freedom (FOIF) marched on St. Patrick’s Day in 1919, one year after women made their official appearance in New York’s annual parade. The FOIF was an American organization with national headquarters in New York. The FIOF supported Ireland’s new Republican Party in its effort to gain independence from Great Britain. There were scores of local branches in the city, like this one from St. Columba Church in Chelsea. (Photo by Museum of the City of New York).   Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach Historian, Emil R. Lucev,...

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HOME TO IRELAND FOR CHRISTMAS circa 1950s

Ads like this were published weekly in many newspapers directed towards Irish immigrants throughout New York City. Thousands of Irish settled in the city following the end of WWII, and many traveled back to the old country to be with their family at Christmastime. Cunard White Star Line offered an installment plan with a small down payment for travel on liners, such as the Laconia and Britannic. Today, you can get the same down payment and installment plan for a Disney Cruise!  (But the prices have changed, just a bit). By Katie Lucev Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach Historian,...

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CROSS BAY BRIDGE Circa 1940s

It was a Fisherman’s Paradise. Opened in June of 1939, the Cross Bay Bridge toll for cars was 10 cents. An average of 10k cars crossed the bridge per week. Reconstruction on the bridge began in 1967 and was completed in 1970, as the bridge looks today. Now drivers pay $4.75 to cross. By Katie Lucev Katie Lucev is the daughter of the late Rockaway Beach Historian, Emil R. Lucev, Sr. (1933-2018)

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